Alice M. Batzel
Published Playwright, Journalist, Freelance Writer 

               Alice M. Batzel  

        Published  Playwright, Journalist


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REVIEW



TITLE:                       THE INVISIBLE BOY



AUTHOR:                 TRUDY LUDWIG


ILLUSTRATOR:      PATRICE BARTON


PUBLISHED DATE:              Oct. 8, 2013


PUBLISHER:                         Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of                                                              Random House Children’s Books, a                                                      division of Random House, Inc. NY.


GENRE:                                  Fiction, children’s, illustrated.


FORMAT:                               Hardback, with illustrations. 


IDENTIFICATION: ISBN 978-1-582-46450-3





MY REVIEW:                 5 STARS OUT OF 5 (Deserving of more.)


REVIEW TITLE:          "HIGH PRAISE FOR A GENTLE STORY PROMOTING ACCEPTANCE AND 

                                          ANTI-BULLYING OF SOCIALLY SHY CHILDREN."


SYNOPSIS:

         Young Brian is shy and has always felt "invisible" at school in comparison to his more social, lively, and popular classmates. He often is excluded from birthday parties, playground games, and lunchtime groups at school. His teacher is frequently preoccupied with more noisy students, making Brian seem "invisible" even to her. When the kids at school find a new boy in their class to be different and make fun of him, Brian quietly becomes his friend. With the help of his talent for drawing, Brian helps his new friend and another classmate to succeed in a school assignment, leading to better acceptance, inclusion, and bust through his "invisibility."


REVIEW CONTENT:

         I give a robust applause for this heartwarming story portrayal of the plight of many young children who experience social shyness. This story is told in a very gentle way, and it can easily be used in young elementary school classrooms, preschool settings, and homes. The message is honest, and both boys and girls can see their self, a sibling, or someone else that they know who resembles young Brian and his quietness. This book is an excellent tool to generate thought and discussion with young children about the value of kindness and acceptance of others who might be different from them. Undoubtedly, this book also can give comfort to children in understanding their self. The illustrations are drawn simply, colored softly, and the illustrator provides a unique portrayal of Brian's feeling of being "invisible." Each picture is a perfect complement to the story and made me fall in love with the gentle teachings of the book.


CONCLUSION:

         I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN'S BOOK. It would make an excellent gift for a child, educator of young children, or for a Pediatrician to have at his/her clinic for young patients to read and enjoy.



Reviewed by:

ALICE M. BATZEL

Published Playwright, Journalist, Freelance Writer


www.alicembatzel.com

Writer@alicembatzel.com

www.facebook.com/alice.batzel


Review posted 11/10/2017 on:

Reviewer’s website (Reviews, 2017 #8)


Facebook Notification of Review posted 11/10/2017on:

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Review posted 11/10/2017 on:

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